FAQ

What’s the benefit of training in bushi kempo ju jitsu?

The disciplined and carefully structured approach to kempo ju jitsu rewards self-advancement through technical ability and application. In particular, kempo ju jitsu helps children to develop co-ordination and self control whilst inspiring confidence and respect not only for themselves, but for their peers and instructor.

Will kempo ju jitsu help me with my fitness or weight control?

Modern kempo ju jitsu provides an excellent opportunity for both children and adults to practice self-defence skills and physical exercise for health, fitness and fun.

 Is there an upper or lower age limit?

Children should be at least 5 years old before they start training. There is no upper age limit, if you’re fit enough.

What do I do if I want to join a class?

Choose a club (see top menu), and contact the instructor first of all.

Do many people join and then quit?

Kempo ju jitsu is a martial skill requiring a long term commitment for progression. We have a 90% retention rate, one of the highest of all martial arts. Most people who start kempo ju jitsu enjoy the training and continue through to high grades.

Will I have to learn Japanese?

Juniors and seniors train using both the English and Japanese names for the techniques.

How fit do I need to be?

All classes begin with warming-up and stretching exercises.

You will not be expected to push yourself further than you are able to go. You will soon find that you begin to benefit, whatever your standard of fitness.

Is there discipline in bushi kempo ju jitsu?

Both discipline and etiquette exist for safety and to develop trust and mutual respect for your teacher and fellow students.

There are a few basic rules of etiquette that you will be taught.

Are there gradings?

There are usually three opportunities to grade per year. They are not obligatory, all students are encouraged to progress at their own pace.

What are the belts?

Belts are used as an indicator of progress, knowledge and experience. In kempo ju jitsu the belts are as follows:

Junior belts:

Red (8th mon), Yellow (7th mon), Orange (6th mon), Green (5th mon), Purple (4th mon), Blue (3rd mon), Brown (2nd mon), Brown (1st mon), Junior Black

Senior belts:

Red (8th kyu), Yellow (7th kyu,) Orange (6th kyu), Green (5th kyu), Purple (4th kyu), Blue (3rd kyu), Brown (2nd kyu), Brown (1st kyu), Senior Black (with progression to further dan grades)

How often should I train?

How often you train is entirely up to you although at least once a week is recommended to start with. The more you train, the better you will be. There are classes every night of the week except Sundays, in a variety of locations throughout Cheshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire and Northern Ireland.

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Comments
  1. Adam Boulton says:

    Hi, I reached Green Belt when I was a teenager. Would I have to start again or could I keep my green belt or be fast tracked? I remember a lot and have continued to practise. I have left messages elsewhere and got no reply. Can you please help me, I am very interested in starting Kempo again.

    • svenfred says:

      Hello Adam. Did you get a reply to your question? If not, I apologise. Your posting was made on the FAQ page & I don’t think it has been forwarded to a particular club for action. Sensei Dave retired some time ago. Sensei Carl Jones is now the Chief Coach. He also runs the club at Cheadle Leisure Centre (on Wednesdays). You can contact him via the contact details on that club page. Or – if you prefer – send me an email to: stramshall.jujitsu@gmail.com . Best regards. Sensei Fred

  2. glenn says:

    Hi BKJJA I used to train in the 80s and have for sale if anyone is interested in 80s books a bushi kempo jitsu official training manual,written and compiled by sensei’s David&Christopher Hand and also a book by Dennis G Palumbo ,secret nidan techniques of hakkoryu jujutsu. Special thanks go to Carl Jones,Gene Mealey and Gary Mealey in the foreword of the kempo manual

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